Focus — November December 2013
Change Language:
Winter Session Speaker Interview

January’s Winter Session welcomes excellent presenters and topics

AMY KIRSCH

What is the most important take-away message of your presentation? In “Scheduling for Success” the participants will walk away with new communication skills and techniques to maintain a productive and profitable schedule.

In “Dynamic Internal Marketing and Customer Service Skills” dental team members will be able to implement key customer service skills the next week to increase new patient referrals and wow their existing patients.

How will hearing your message change the way the attendees work and practice? Attendees will gain a new confidence in their communication skills and how they can impact production, new patient flow and customer service in their practice.

What do you think the most common barrier to success is in the dental practice and what do you tell attendees about addressing this barrier/ overcoming it? In “Scheduling for Success” the biggest obstacle in scheduling success is letting the patients be in control of the schedule instead of the dental team. It is exciting to realize you can have an ideal schedule that works for you and your patients. All it takes is designing good scheduling templates and enhancing scheduling communication skills.

In “Dynamic Internal Marketing and Customer Service Skills” it’s that most dental team members and their doctors have never received customer service training and do not know how it should apply to their practice.Many practices continually study customer service skills by visiting Nordstrom’s, Ritz Carlton, Disneyland and read a customer service books each quarter.

During your time speaking to dental audiences, what question(s) are you asked most often, and how do you answer it? The question: How do I get my doctor or team members to change and implement these changes? The answer: Any positive changes need to trickle down from the leader to the team. Most teams and doctors want positive changes they just are unsure of why or how to do it. Having regular staff meetings to discuss goals, the practice philosophy and how to implement the changes is key.

DR. JOE CAMP

What is the most important take-away message of your presentation? In “Endodontic Diagnosis and Case Difficulty Assessment” correct diagnosis is critical; otherwise any treatment rendered does not help the patient and is, in fact, detrimental to the patient. All tests must be performed to arrive at correct diagnosis. Do not do a root canal unless you are certain it is needed.

In “Pulpal Management of Traumatic Injuries” time is critical to success in many areas of trauma treatment. All traumatic injuries of teeth must be treated as true emergencies until examination proves otherwise. In some areas of trauma, delaying proper treatment may decrease prognosis dramatically.

How will hearing your message change the way the attendees work and practice? In “Endodontic Diagnosis and Case Difficulty Assessment” it will provide correct diagnostic tests to follow and explain why. Clinician will learn best way to perform tests and their interpretation.

In “Pulpal Management of Traumatic Injuries” hopefully they will see all traumatic injuries immediately and decide if treatment must be rendered then, or can be postponed to a more convenient time.

What do you think the most common barrier to success is in the dental practice and what do you tell attendees about addressing this barrier/ overcoming it? In “Endodontic Diagnosis and Case Difficulty Assessment” jumping to conclusions without taking time to do diagnostic tests properly. In “Pulpal Management of Traumatic Injuries” not treating any dental injury as a true emergency and delaying examination until it is convenient for dentist.You must make yourself available to see patient or have arrangements with someone who will take responsibility. Never tell patient to call another dentist or specialist. You call and then call patient back to be sure patient is examined.

During your time speaking to dental audiences, what question(s) are you asked most often, and how do you answer it? In “Endodontic Diagnosis and Case Difficulty Assessment” the question: what should I do if I cannot be sure, although I am suspicious of one tooth and patient is in pain? The answer: Seek help from an associate or refer patient to specialist. Do not do treatment to find out if you were correct.If minor pain, place patient on analgesic and wait for more symptoms.

In “Pulpal Management of Traumatic Injuries” the question: At an injury site what is most important aspect? The answer: Make sure patient has no life-threatening injuries which always take precedence over teeth injuries.

DR. LOU GRAHAM

What is the most important take-away message of your presentation? I work Monday through Thursday and truly am a “wet fingered dentist”. My patients are from 14 to 102 years of age, so I’m truly a family practitioner with a very conservative, down-to-earth philosophy … getting teeth to their 85th birthday.I present updates on the very latest materials and how to utilize them efficiently and expect longer term successful outcomes.

How will hearing your message change the way the attendees work and practice? A routine comment after my programs is that I provide so many nuggets of information for everyday casework that they can use Monday! I am not going to revolutionize their practices; what I am going to do is challenge them and it’s this they take back to the chair Monday, hopefully with smiles.

What do you think the most common barrier to success is in the dental practice and what do you tell attendees about addressing this barrier/overcoming it? This program is all about recession-proof general dentistry. The biggest concern to our practices, in my eyes, is PPOs—and openly I discuss value-time based dentistry. I definitely do things that are philosophically based, but still running a business model.

During your time speaking to dental audiences, what question(s) are you asked most often, and how do you answer it? A lot of the questions are routinely procedure based. I present a variety of clinical procedures, supported by research, and I truly want each participant to understand “why” on each step and “how” to accomplish.The atmosphere in every program is casual and all about sharing.

FRANCES WILMES

What is the most important take-away message of your presentation? In “Shielding Your Practice through OSHA Compliance and Safety” the message is that it’s of the upmost importance to initiate safety protocols and in-office policies, provide training to employees and comply with regulations and standards set by OSHA and CDC. Implementation of and compliance to a safety program are not optional in the practice of dentistry. As dental healthcare professionals, we are practicing within the fastest growing industry sector.Unfortunately, we have one of the highest rates of injury and illness cases than any other private industry sector … more than manufacturing!It’s time to take safety procedures to the next level.

In “Infection Control for the Dental Auxiliary” it’s a reminder that as dental healthcare professionals we hold a special trust within society and have an ethical and legal obligation to adhere to standards regarding infection control. We need to bring the importance of infection control back to the forefront of our priority list. Lack of compliance and complacency towards following infection control protocols can jeopardize the existence of your practice.

How will hearing your message change the way the attendees work and practice? From “Shielding Your Practice through OSHA Compliance and Safety” attendees will take the knowledge gained from this seminar back to their facilities and utilize it in a way that will create a safe and healthy work environment.Tips, strategies and preventive measures will be provided to encourage compliance and to assist in developing a safety program for their facility. OSHA is beginning to hold employees more accountable for their actions— more now than ever before. Attendees will recognize the need for following compliance and utilize the information to provide a safer facility for their patient, protect the employee from hazards and assist the employer in becoming OSHA compliant.

In “Infection Control for the Dental Auxiliary” it is my intention for the attendee to take this information and begin enforcing any necessary changes immediately. It only takes one case of infection/ disease transmission to occur in a dental setting to have severe consequences that in turn will be highly publicized and possibly lethal. I will encourage a team approach with discipline, regular training sessions and educational opportunities for team members. Attentiveness towards completing the provided ASAP checklist will be encouraged.

What do you think the most common barrier to success is in the dental practice and what do you tell attendees about addressing this barrier/overcoming it? In regard to “Shielding Your Practice through OSHA Compliance and Safety” the barrier as it relates to OSHA compliance is time and inattentiveness to the importance of following regulations and standards. Some may adopt the mindset, “Nothing serious is ever going to happen at our facility and besides OSHA will never come to inspect us!” The typical day in a dental facility is filled with so many responsibilities, pressing tasks and obligations to our patients and compliance may end up taking a back seat. Gone are the days when we can practice dentistry and ignore the rules and regulations that have been enforced. Our patients are more observant and expect a safer office and health related protocols to be followed.The employees are more informed of their rights to a safer workplace and are more likely to report to OSHA if serious violations are occurring. So, I try to motivate the attendee and offer suggestions on how to acquire assistance from OSHA and inform attendees of additional resources available to implement a safety program to include the urgency of an effective safety program.

In “Infection Control for the Dental Auxiliary” the most common barrier is not having the ability to overcome the obstacle of change. So many times auxiliaries are put in a position that does not allow them to make changes easily. Too often I hear the all too familiar saying, “Well, we’ve always done it this way.” During the lecture, I try to motivate and encourage my attendees to use the knowledge they have gained and to empower themselves by adopting a team-approach. By sharing what they have learned and explaining the advantages to their co-workers, everyone can work in unison and strive for full compliance together.

During your time speaking to dental audiences, what question(s) are you asked most often, and how do you answer it? In “Shielding Your Practice through OSHA Compliance and Safety” the most common questions asked are in regards to personal protective equipment (PPE), primarily utility gloves, eyewear and gowns. I also receive questions in regards to post-exposure protocol and current updates regarding Hepatitis Band C. Throughout my lecture, I am constantly providing information to guide the attendees towards the development of their Exposure Control Plan, Hazard Communication Plan, Fire Prevention and Emergency Action Plans.

In “Infection Control for the Dental Auxiliary” the most commonly asked questions are in regards to the process of disinfecting treatment rooms and preventing crosscontamination, preparing instruments for sterilization and the process of sterilization. I am also questioned about dental waterlines, water safety and hand hygiene. I answer the questions in reference to the MMWR and CDC guidelines, which offer problem-solving techniques and allow for a smoother transition when change is necessary.

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